Hotel review: Park Hyatt Tokyo.

Before I start this review, I have to say that nothing I had read or heard about this hotel was able to capture what it is really like…so when you read this, know that it is actually just so much better than I could ever show or describe.

With that in mind, I’m going to write a series of posts to try my best. This first post is all about the actual room: what it was like, how we booked it, and other important details.

Park Suite King

From the moment you hold the silver Tiffany key ring in your hand, you know that you are in for a special treat.

park hyatt tokyo key

The hotel has a hushed feel to it. Part of it is the thick carpeting and excellent soundproofing. The rest is pure Park Hyatt ambiance.

The door to each room is framed with special objects set on pedestals.

IMG_3816

The door opens onto a short hallway with a smart design: each side features sliding doors where you can store your luggage.

IMG_3815

There is enough space for multiple suitcases, with room to spare.

IMG_3808

The hallway opens directly onto an entryway.

IMG_3807

The entryway is beautiful, and features more art on pedestals.

IMG_3814

The room itself is large and very nicely laid out. There is a sitting area on one side of the main room.

IMG_3242On the other side of the main room, there is a table and chairs.

IMG_3240

Here is a view of the entire room:

IMG_3244The views are amazing.

IMG_3314

Opposite the windows in the main room, there is an entertainment center.

IMG_3241

If you open all of the doors and peek in all the cubbies, you will find tea with beautiful teacups…

IMG_3249

a min fridge with an array of drinks…
IMG_3252

and a coffeemaker.

IMG_3272

The bedroom is serene. We loved the bed. The mattress was definitely firmer than most Western mattresses, but since that is what we like, we were really happy.

IMG_3247

There is another entertainment center in the bedroom – sorry for the weird reflections on the TV screen, but I took the photo at night and that is unfortunately how it came out.

IMG_3817

The bathroom is right off the bedroom. It runs the width of the room, and has both a deep soaking tub and a shower.

The tub was fantastic.

IMG_3229

The tub filled really quickly and the water got really hot, both of which made for a luxurious bath, especially because of the really nice bath salts and Aesop amenities.

IMG_3267

The shower was fantastic as well.

IMG_3268

At first, my kids were scared of the toilet, but after they tried it, they were hooked (a heated seat! surprising squirting water)! Now they want us to get a Japanese toilet for our house.

IMG_3232

There is a double sink in the bathroom.

IMG_3231

Amenities are plentiful.

IMG_3300

There is also a vanity in the bathroom.

IMG_3233

In all, we were very comfortable in the room. It was definitely large enough for all four of us – they provided two rollaways for my kids, and those fit into the room with no problem at all.

TIP: If you want to be on the no-smoking floor, you definitely should request this at the time of booking. We were originally given a suite on a regular floor, and it smelled very strongly of cigarette smoke.

How we booked this room using Hyatt points.

We planned and booked this vacation almost a year ago, and a few things have changed since then. When we originally booked, we used the two free nights Josh got by applying for the Hyatt Visa – and since he was a Hyatt Diamond member at the time that he applied for the card, he got the two free nights in a suite. That is not the case anymore – you can only get two free nights in a regular room when you apply for the card.

We then spent 33,000 Hyatt points per night for the three remaining nights (old rates) for a total of 99,000 points.

So our five-night stay cost 99,000 Hyatt points.

If you wanted to book this same room at the current rates, you would need 48,000 points per night. So at the current rates, our stay would cost 240,000 points. A HUGE amount, by any standards.

If you are curious, the same stay would cost $400-$500/night for a standard room and around $1,200/night for a suite if you paid actual money.

Is it worth it? I’ll cover all of the other features and amenities of the hotel in a few more posts, and you can decide for yourself. 😉

Have you stayed at the Park Hyatt Tokyo? What did you think? If you haven’t stayed here, I’m also so curious if you would want to?

 

Comments

  1. Only the first two pictures load =(

    • SharonG says:

      They took a while to load for me … but were definitely worth the wait! Green with envy!!
      Hope the rest of the trip continues to be just as wonderful for you, Josh, Bird and Bear.

    • Points Pixie says:

      Ang – Oh no! Try again? Let me know if you still can’t do it and I will see if I can change anything to make it happen.

  2. ChetTheJet says:

    Great review of the PHT! What would the nightly rate be for that room if paying out of pocket?

    • Points Pixie says:

      ChetTheJet – Oops, forgot that part. I will edit my review to include. Standard rooms go for $400-$500 a night, while the Park Suite goes for around $1200.

  3. Just left the Park Hyatt today, having spent our first and last day of a Japan vacation there. I second your sentiments, even as someone who claims not to value the “luxury” hotel thing. I have stayed at many expensive hotels, but this one is entirely different start to finish. Glad it was free, though!

  4. I have a trip to Tokyo next year. How do you get to PH from the airport? Thanks

    • Points Pixie says:

      Ken – Stay tuned for a future review. I will definitely write about that, because the transportation was VERY confusing at first.

  5. Very Nice! Thanks so much for the great pics of the suite. I wonder if this suite is the one commonly given to DMs. Luv

    • Points Pixie says:

      Lettie – Yes, this is the suite you get if you are a Diamond member and pay for a standard room with cash, then upgrade using a Diamond Suite upgrade. You can also book the room using 48,000 points per night.

  6. Alison Heafey says:

    Looks fabulous! What are the rates on the suites if you are not a points and miles goddess??

    • Points Pixie says:

      Alison – Standard rooms are $400-$500 per night, while the suite is around $1,200 per night.

  7. Try the Peninsula or Mandarin Oriental if you want to go way over the top, but it sounds like you checked all of the important boxes. You never mentioned whether you and Josh watched Lost in Translation to prepare…

    • Points Pixie says:

      Bob – We definitely enjoyed every drop of the hotel. And it’s funny, we planned to re-watch Lost in Translation before we arrived, but we didn’t have time.

  8. One other note, Toto has an office in Atlanta through which I ordered my toilet (full remote controls under $2,000) — it was getting the electrician to add an outlet in the MB watercloset that was fun, but worth it!

  9. Tzukino says:

    Thank you for the report! I’m booking rooms the same way! Have you been to the Andaz? I have some nights there too also in points :)!

    • Points Pixie says:

      Tzukino – Awesome! I’m sure the Andaz is amazing. You should check out Tokyo Hyatt Fan’s blog for details – he is the expert.

  10. Et tu, Kendra? Toilet photos?:) just kidding. In this case the toilet IS part of culture. Kendra, always the innovator!

Speak Your Mind

*